Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Is Electric Right for You?

Is Electric Right for You?

October 31, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Engines are like people — the older they get the crankier and more in need of repair they become. As soon as you have replaced one part another goes; after doing that for a while, it doesn’t make sense to sink more money into repairs. Once you’ve reached the point of swapping the old engine […]

Cracking Boating’s Codes

Cracking Boating’s Codes

September 1, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

To an outsider, the world of boating can seem filled with all sorts of undecipherable abbreviations. While most boaties are welcoming, newbies and landlubber friends can get lost if we lapse into confusing and opaque jargon. Our coded talk may be merely exclusionary, or it might just jeopardize a passenger’s safety. Safety is the concern […]

Lighter Footprints

Lighter Footprints

June 1, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Human-caused climate change is an issue of our time. While no figures are available for recreational boating greenhouse gas emissions, the National Marine Manufacturers Association says that over 87 million Americans participate in recreational boating at least once yearly. If over 35 percent of the population engages in a motor-driven activity, chances are that carbon […]

Why Get a Boat Survey?

Why Get a Boat Survey?

February 1, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

  Buying a boat may be the second biggest purchase you make after buying a house; as with a home, a motor or sailboat is complex with lots of components. That means a lot can go wrong! Just as it’s smart to hire a home inspector or engineer before buying a new home, it’s advisable […]

Educating and Legislating for Safer Paddling

Educating and Legislating for Safer Paddling

October 1, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

. According to U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) statistics, 50 percent of 2015’s recreational boating fatalities were of people engaged in paddle sports. Kayaks, canoes, and stand-up paddleboards are among the most affordable paddlecraft, but their easy accessibility may lead to errors resulting in harm. Legislators and regulators across the country are looking closely at how […]

Predicting and Planning for Heat Waves

Predicting and Planning for Heat Waves

June 1, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

. While climate scientists are able to formulate ideas about what weather would be like in winter using the El Niño weather pattern, they did not previously have accurate tools available to predict when summer heat waves would occur. They do now with research on the Pacific Extreme Pattern. In early 2016, Karen McKinnon, a […]

A Flying Lifesaver in Our Future

A Flying Lifesaver in Our Future

August 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

. There’s a new lifesaving system in development for use with remote control flying drones. The device, called Ryptide, was designed and tested with the help of students at King Low Heywood Thomas, a private school in Connecticut. Project Ryptide began under the guidance of Bill Piedra, who teaches computer science at the school. He […]

Are Historic Ships Welcome in New York Harbor?

Are Historic Ships Welcome in New York Harbor?

March 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Last summer, visitors to the Intrepid Museum’s pier in Manhattan may have seen the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) sail training ship, USCG Eagle, wedged in an angle against a dock 145 feet shorter than the ship itself. Was the crew in a hurry to enjoy New York City’s sights after too much time at sea? […]

Seafaring Jargon

Seafaring Jargon

November 20, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Have you ever wondered why a vessel’s toilet is a head, and instead of turning left or right on the water, you’ll turn port or starboard? Such seafaring terms are almost exclusively used as part of the language we speak on the sea, but the language of long-gone sailors migrated inland, coloring our language and […]

After an Incident

After an Incident

September 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

In late spring, a news report told of a leisure yacht ramming a 70-foot ocean racing trimaran. Though the yacht’s skipper hit and tried to run, one witness to the accident was a sailing journalist who pursued the vessel down the Hudson River Bjorn Kils of NY Media Boat, writing about the accident, reported that, […]

No Man Goes It Alone

No Man Goes It Alone

May 26, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

. Four graduates from Exeter University in England plan to spend June and much of July racing 2,400 miles across the Pacific from Monterey Bay to Honolulu. Their endurance rowing feat in New Ocean Wave’s Great Pacific Race is designed to raise awareness about the HPV-related cancer epidemic in men and women, campaign for universal […]

Jumpy, Swinging Jet Stream

Jumpy, Swinging Jet Stream

May 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

With the very warm winter of 2011-2012, followed by the arctic temperatures this past winter, we are all aware of something “not being quite right” about the weather. A New Jersey professor may have found the reason — she suggests that the jet stream is behaving differently because the Arctic is warming very quickly. Professor […]

Racing Slowly Across the Pacific

Racing Slowly Across the Pacific

April 1, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Though it sounds like the name of an action-adventure movie, the Great Pacific Race won’t be showing at the cinema.  Instead, 16 boats are scheduled to leave Monterey Bay in June and row 2,100 miles across the Pacific to Hawaii. This challenge will test crews from eight nations as they cross the ocean the slow […]

A Reason to Race

A Reason to Race

September 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

. What would tempt two people to row 2,900 miles across the Atlantic Ocean? Two friends from Britain planning the row have a compelling answer—they are doing it to raise funds for the charities that supported their friend before cancer claimed her life. Hannah Lawton and Jessie VanBeck rowed with Eleanor Rose Ellis in a […]

Superstitions at Sea

Superstitions at Sea

June 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

. No one has ever fully understood the sea— more people have been to the Moon than have been to the deepest parts of the ocean— so superstitions about it have been passed down through the centuries.  What scared a gnarled old sailor witless in the past, however, just makes us scratch our heads in […]

Wanted: Leisure Boaters in NYC

Wanted: Leisure Boaters in NYC

May 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

. With the planned opening of the Bay Ridge, Brooklyn eco-dock, New York City is beginning to reconnect with its harbor, the very thing that launched its growth. Until recently, the waterways of New York City were primarily used for heavy industry, including commercial docks, ship repair yards, and fishing enterprises.  Relative to its exposure […]

Storm Surges and Rising Sea Levels

Storm Surges and Rising Sea Levels

April 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Can LI be Protected? Much of our region’s coastal area was severely flooded during Superstorm Sandy. Can we permanently prevent a repeat performance, or should officials and environmentalists work to manage the inevitable? After the devastating storm, many called for a barrier to protect metropolitan New York City. In the Sea Level Rise Task Force […]

Panic at the Water’s Edge – Overcoming Hydrophobia

Panic at the Water’s Edge – Overcoming Hydrophobia

February 1, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

When someone in the family suffers from a lifelong fear of water (hydrophobia), or suddenly develops it after years of boating, it can be disruptive and often disabling.  The fear may be passed along by parents or arise from a sudden trauma, but however it arrives, the phobia can be effectively diminished or eliminated. Martin […]

The Scent of a Storm

The Scent of a Storm

October 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Watching a storm rolling in from the sea engages our senses — the sight of the lightning and the violent seas, the sound of the thunder rolling in. Many people swear that they smell storms, too. We understand what comes to our eyes and ears, but what about our nostrils? Professor William Cain of the […]

Catching Up With Clark & Storck at the U.S. Olympics

Catching Up With Clark & Storck at the U.S. Olympics

July 30, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Weymouth, UK — One thing all the competitors on the U.S. Olympic Sailing Team agreed ahead of the Olympics was that it would be windy. “How windy?” wondered many, given that the Olympic warm up regatta here in June was punctuated with hurricane force winds and had to be stopped for two days!!! If the […]

Sailing Towards Olympic Dreams

Sailing Towards Olympic Dreams

July 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

. In  early May, Debbie Capozzi began possibly the most important sailing regatta of her life in Weymouth, England. If her team came first among the four American competitors in the regatta, she would get into the Olympics. If they lost? Everything she’d worked for over the last four years would be for nothing. Three […]

Lightning Strikes

Lightning Strikes

July 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

The news report read, “Two men had a lucky escape when their yacht was struck by lightning off the coast in Sunday evening’s heavy electrical storm … The strike brought down the mast and rigging and disabled all electrical equipment on board. But the crew of two … escaped injury.”

Predicting Hurricanes

Predicting Hurricanes

June 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

When it comes to weather prediction, meteorologists at the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction in the UK need a new computer. Their current computer does a mere 100 trillion calculations per second, and they need an upgrade to provide more accurate long-term forecasts.

Petro-Alternative Power

Petro-Alternative Power

June 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

As budget-conscious boaters seek alternatives to gas power, a European vessel recently completed an expedition around the world using only solar energy.

Kiteboarding

Kiteboarding

May 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Sitting on the Peconic Bay beach on a windy afternoon, you may see people off shore who are defying gravity via flying kites. You’ll also hear them shout as they blast along the water while making huge jumps. They are kiteboarding (also known as kitesurfing), which is a truly three-dimensional sport, with riders mastering the air and the sea using wind power alone.

Ever-Changing Tides

Ever-Changing Tides

February 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Trying to make headway against an opposing tide, we understand that the current slowing us down has something to do with the Moon pulling the water. But what exactly are tides and how do they work?

Mental Fitness Through Boating

Mental Fitness Through Boating

January 1, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

We know that an apple a day may keep the doctor away, but are there extra benefits from eating that apple on a boat? According to psychiatrist Dr. Sue Varma, who practices in Manhattan, being out on the water may help keep us mentally healthy.